More evidence this is the offshore “recovery”…

I was going to write this anyway today and then looked at the oil price as I was leaving work… down 2.7% at the time of pixel… The graph above comes from the Dallas Fed blog which makes this salient point and helps explain why:

Given current market prices, U.S. shale production will continue growing this year. Indeed, a recent report by the International Energy Agency highlighted that shale production is likely to be a major driver over the next five years. This does not rule out the possibility of major oil price movements, but it does point to a strong tendency that oil prices will be range bound in the near future.

Read the whole thing. Shale has structurally changed the oil industry and fundamentally changed any realistic scenarios for an “offshore recovery”.

Contrast that with the investment boom in shale: If you want to see how the whole ecosystem of companies and innovation are working in a harmony to make US shale more efficient, deepen the capital base, and thereby work in a virtuous circle then this article from the Houston Chronicle that showcases a GEBH project to turn flared gas into power in the region is a great anecdote:

Baker Hughes is using the Permian Basin in West Texas to debut a fleet of new turbines that use excess natural gas from a drilling site to power hydraulic fracturing equipment — reducing flaring, carbon dioxide emissions, people and equipment in remote locations…

Baker Hughes estimates 500 hydraulic fracturing fleets are deployed in shale basins across the United States and Canada. Most of them are powered by trailer-mounted diesel engines. Each fleet consumes more than 7 million gallons of diesel per year, emits an average of 70,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide and require 700,000 tanker truck loads of diesel supplied to remote sites, according to Baker Hughes.

“Electric frack enables the switch from diesel-driven to electrical-driven pumps powered by modular gas turbine generating units,” Simonelli said. “This alleviates several limiting factors for the operator and the pressure pumping company such as diesel truck logistics, excess gas handling, carbon emissions and the reliability of the pressure pumping operation.”

More capital, greater efficiency, and capital deepening. It is a virtuous circle that increases productivity and economic returns and is the signal for firms to invest more. It is a completely different investment dynamic to the one driving offshore projects at the moment.

Shale productivity.png

The above graph from the IEA makess a point I have made any times here: there is no real cost pressure in shale beyond labour (which will drop in the long run). Shale is all about productivity and cost improvement driven by mass production, something the US economy has as an almost intrinsic quality. The cost improvements in offshore are solely the result of over-capitalised assets earning less than their economic rate of return (i.e. oversupply) and is clearly not sustainable in the long run.

That is why firms with a low cost of capital are vacating fields like the North Sea to firms with a higher cost of capital: one requires steady investment and scale, the other investment is a punt on a shortage and price inflation. [A post for another day will be on how on earth some of these larger investors actually get out of the North Sea.]

This IEA data also tells you why this is the offshore reocvery:

IEA 2019 investment mix.png

The IEA is also forecasting overall spending to increase just 6%. So offshore just isn’t getting investment at the margin that will drive fleet utilisation and expansion. In company accounts this is showing up as depreciation significantly outpacing investment and is a constant across the industry. The economics of offshore are such that profitability is dictated by marginal demand (i.e. that one extra day of utilisation at a higher rate) and this graph shows the industry built a fleet for a far higher level and the only realistic prospect here is for structurally lower profitability. Given the high capital costs of the assets this is going to take a long time for the oversupply to work out.

For manufacturers (i.e. subsea trees) the recession is generally over, although not for Weatherford, but if it floats nothing but a wall of oversupply and below economic pricing and therefore sub economic returns is the logical consequence of this industry structure and market dynamic.

The hope of a massive demand boom kept banks from foreclosing and led hedge funds and other alternative capital providers putting money into assets that were (and are) losing cash but seen as “valuable” in the future. Slowly it is becoming apparent there is no credible path to anything other than liquidation for many companies still in business.

Rates will slowly rise, and so will utilisation levels, but only to economic levels i.e. covering their cost of capital in a perfectly competitive market. Absent a demand boom liquidity slowly, and then quickly, vanishes. And that is finally starting to happen now. For example the McDermott 10.25% 2024 bonds, already very expensive, were trading at well below par today implying a 13.5% yield, in effect locking them out of the unsecured credit market completely (and in reality all credit markets). A restructuring beckons. MDR will not be the only one by any stretch. Many rig companies will do a Chap 22 and a wave of supply companies in Europe and Asia are uneconomic and simply cannot survive under realistic financial assumptions.

Slowly the overcapacity in the industry will work its way out to more economically sustainable day rates with higher utilisation levels in a smaller global offshore rig and vessel fleet. But it won’t be a return to 2013, it will be a return to a far lower profitability level despite the smaller fleet, higher prices, and less time and utilisation risk taken smaller companies. There will be a complete wipe-out, almost without exception, of investors who backed offshore “recovery” theses of asset backed companies and an inability of these companies to access funding almost at any price levels. Theories about assets recovering to values implied by book value will be realised for what they are: a fantasy no serious person could believe.

But a far more rational industry and market will emerge. The only thing that could change the dynamic outlined above is a massive demand boom, and the graphs above show you why that isn’t going to happen.

IEA global upstream investment 2019.png

Increasing US oil production… Just like the man said…

[P]rogress in science is not a simple line leading to the truth. It is more progress away from less adequate conceptions of, and interactions with, the world.

Thomas Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

Some excellent data from the EIA this week confirmed that US production, even with the known Permian constraint issues, is powering ahead and is excess of previous forecast levels. My hypothesis, hardly controversial, is that there is a strong negative correlation between these graphs and offshore vessel values.

This is playing out almost exactly as Spencer Dale predicted in 2015. This is a generational change in oil production that is clearly going to impact on any “offshore recovery” theory… some of which are starting to sound a little desperate and absurd. I have referenced the Spencer Dale article before and if you are looking for a unifying theory of why any offshore recovery is likely to be delayed and anemic I think it is still the most relevant and lucid explanation.

Deepwater to fund shale and renewables…

From a great article in the $FT today:

For the Anglo-Dutch major, drilling far beneath oceans is essential for raising the funds for investments that will steer it through an uncertain energy transition.

“The responsibility deepwater has is to generate the cash that is going to pay for shales and for renewables,” said Wael Sawan, Shell’s head of deepwater exploration and production. “From 2020 we start to pay the bills for the organisation,” added Mr Sawan…

The company is banking on this new profit centre — alongside conventional fossil fuels, integrated gas and its refining arm — to cover the dividend, finance debt and pay for the investments that will future-proof Shell.

Likely to have made some shareholders in companies like Seadrill (shares down 23% in the last month) and Tidewater (shares down 27% in a fortnight) choke on their cornflakes this morning…,

You can obviously make money from shale…

From the Conoco Phillips Q3 2018 results today… a $600m turnaround in the Lower 48 (shale) on this time last year… and yes CP is investing more in Lower 48 than earnings… mainly I suspect because the return on capital looks so good…

COP dates

CP Capex Q3 2018.png

It is quite amazing you can see an article titled this:

Red Flags on U.S. Fracking Disappointing Financial Performance Continues

And then get a table like this:

FCF Shale.png

My views on this here…With the onshore rig count near an all time it actually looks like good financial performance is encouraging even greater investment… something the offshore community should understand well.

#capitaldeepening #productivity

Shale versus offshore: SLB version

In 1984, a cellphone weighed two pounds, was nothing but a telephone, and cost $10,277 in today’s $. Today, a smartphone is also a camera, radio, television set, alarm clock, newspaper, photo album, voice recorder, map, and compass, and cost as little as $99…

Human Progress

A lot of press being made about the Schlumberger comments regarding shale reaching its production limits. Coincidentally(?) The Economist has a leader and an article on the same this week. I don’t have the technical knowledge to get into the Parent/Child well productivity debate  but I note this is not the first time the death of shale productivity has been forecast (particularly eagerly by the offshore community for obvious reasons).

What was less reported was this nugget from the same SLB results:

Offshore Angola, Sand Management Services deployed a combination of technologies for Total E&P Angola to save more than $100 million and gain an estimated 1 million BOE of incremental production in the Kaombo deepwater development. Combining the OptiPac* openhole Alternate Path‡ gravel-pack service with OSMP* OptiPac service mechanical packers enabled the customer to achieve target production with six wells instead of the planned eight. This combination of technologies enabled effective zonal isolation of complex stacked reservoirs in one field, while in another field the water shutoff capability of the technology enabled accelerated production. [Emphasis added]

SLB appears to have developed a technology that has reduced the number of wells by 25%? That will signficantly lower the cost of the development but at the cost of rig and vessel days as well as lower subsea well orders if applicable in other developments.

This is the future of offshore. More work onshore and less offshore proportionately where the costs and risks are significantly higher. Productivity increases like this, not based on selling high capital equipment below cost, will be important for the industry.

I am also not convinced shale productivity is decreasing. The declining demand (and margins) faced by SLB and HAL could well be the result of larger E&P companies internalizing costs and driving them down as they seek to “mass produce” shale oil. We shall see… The BHGE rig count was at levels not seen since 2015 last week.

There is actually a much bigger change going on in the supply chain. In the old offshore geographically dispersed fields and rigs made using contractors like Schlumberger the logical option from both a cost and skills point-of-view. But when you are committed to a region like the Permian (or Bakken etc) you have critical mass and it makes sense to internalise those skills and capabilities.

Shale has dropped significantly in cost terms and a plateau of some sort should be expected. But shale is a mass production technology and the slow relentless grind of an annual 1 or 2% productivity input is still a real issue for offshore where each development is to a certain extent custom designed and therefore subject to limited economies of scale. That is true for the rigs and vessels throughout the supply chain as much as it is for the field lay-out and wells. Offshore needs companies like SLB to produce innovations as described above but the future of offshore is having less assets do more for similar outcomes.

Unconventional verus offshore demand at the margin…

Economic growth occurs whenever people take resources and rearrange them in ways that are more valuable. A useful metaphor for production in an economy comes from the kitchen. To create valuable final products, we mix inexpensive ingredients together according to a recipe. The cooking one can do is limited by the supply of ingredients, and most cooking in the economy produces undesirable side effects. If economic growth could be achieved only by doing more and more of the same kind of cooking, we would eventually run out of raw materials and suffer from unacceptable levels of pollution and nuisance. Human history teaches us, however, that economic growth springs from better recipes, not just from more cooking. New recipes generally produce fewer unpleasant side effects and generate more economic value per unit of raw material…

Every generation has perceived the limits to growth that finite resources and undesirable side effects would pose if no new recipes or ideas were discovered. And every generation has underestimated the potential for finding new recipes and ideas. We consistently fail to grasp how many ideas remain to be discovered. The difficulty is the same one we have with compounding. Possibilities do not add up. They multiply.

Paul Romer (Nobel Prize winner in Economics 2018)

Good article in the $FT today on Shell’s attitude to US shale production:

Growing oil and gas production from shale fields will act as a “balance” for deepwater projects, the new head of Royal Dutch Shell’s US business said, as the energy major strives for flexibility in the transition to cleaner fuels. Gretchen Watkins said drilling far beneath oceans in the US Gulf of Mexico, Brazil and Nigeria secured revenues for the longer-term, but tapping shale reserves in the US, Canada and Argentina enabled nimble decision-making.

“The role that [the shale business] plays in Shell’s portfolio is one of being a good balance for deepwater,” Ms Watkins said in her first interview since she joined the Anglo-Dutch major in May…

Shell is allocating between $2bn and $3bn every year to the shale business, which is about 10 per cent of the company’s annual capital expenditure until 2020 and half of its expected spending on deepwater projects. [Emphasis added].

Notice the importance of investing in the energy transition as well. For oil companies this is important and not merely rhetoric. Recycling cash generated from higher margin oil into products that will ensure the survival of the firm longer term even if at a lower return level is currently in vogue for large E&P companies. 5 years ago a large proportion of that shale budget would have gone to offshore, and 100% of the energy transition budget would have gone to upstream.

The graph at the top from Wood MacKenzie is an illustration of this and the corollary to the declining offshore rig numbers I mentioned here. Offshore is an industry in the middle of a period of huge structural change as it’s core users open up a vast new production frontier unimaginable only a short period before. The only certainty associated with this is lower structural profits for the industry than existed ex ante.

Note also the split that the – are making between high CapEx deepwater projects and shale. Shell’s deal yesterday with Noreco was a classic case of getting out of a sizable business squarely in the middle of these: capital-intensive and not scalable (but still a great business). PE style companies will run these assets for cash and seem less concerned about the decom liabilities.

You can also see this play out in terms of generating future supply and the importance of unconventional in this waterfall:

Shale production growth

As you can see from the graph above even under best case assumptions shale is set to take around 45% of new production growth. When the majority of the offshore fleet was being built if you had drawn a graph like this people would have thought you were mad – and you would have been – it just highlights the enormous increase in productivity in shale. All this adds up to a lack of demand momentum for more marginal offshore projects. The E&P companies that are investing, like Noreco, have less scale and resources and a higher cost of capital which will flow through the supply chain in terms of higher margin requirements to get investment approval. This means a smaller quantity of approved projects as higher return requirements means a smaller number of possible projects.

Don’t believe the scare stories about reserves! The market has a way of adjusting (although I am not arguing it is a perfect mechanism!):

Running Out of Oil.png

Shale and structural change…

The graph above is from the IEA’s most recent energy report. No huge surprises for anyone reading this blog but the historical comparison is interesting. When someone tells you that offshore isn’t facing structural issues this graph would be a good data point to discuss. The IEA is also sounding more confident of shale becoming cash flow positive although as I have said I don’t think that is a big issue. My scepticism of plans that involve buying a load of ‘cheap’ offshore assets and waiting for ‘the inevitable’ recovery continues to grow…