Scrapping and UKCS North Sea demand…

Spirit Energy (67% owned by Centrica) awarded a 3 well / 6 month drilling contract this week to the Transocean Leader. The Transocean Leader was built-in 1987, 4500ft 3G semi, that had a major upgrade in 2012. I remember 1987, my first year of high school, the All Blacks won the inaugural Rugby World Cup with ‘The Iceman (Michael Jones)’, Fleetwood Mac and U2 were cool (or I thought they were), my sister listened to Whitney Houston (okay that isn’t strictly true more The Dead Kennedys). In other words it was a while ago. I’m not a rig expert, and like vessels there are a lot of nuances around what kit can at times do what job. I don’t want to get into those, and my point here isn’t to publish a post every time an old rig wins a job.

My point is that this is a 31-year-old rig, that earlier this year had operational problems forcing it to return to a shipyard for repair before it could continue its contracted workscope, could comfortably win work with a significant UKCS (and international) operator. At 31 years old, and operating in the UK sector, it would be unreasonable to not to expect the odd issue, and indeed when that happened Dana and Transocean settled on a commercial deal to avoid contract termination. E&P operators may prefer new kit, find me an engineer who doesn’t, but the commercial guys like best priced kit in the current environment, and at the moment they are firmly in-charge of procurement.

For all the talk of scrapping being inevitable there are a lot of examples of older kit being contracted by big owners. Simply marking a build year and saying that everything older than that will be scrapped is proving to be an unrealistic forecast methodology across all asset classes (i.e. Fletcher Shipping with the Standard Drilling PSVs). Scrapping is likely to be far more selective around owner financial resources, work programmes forecast, and age, with the relationship between all three more important than any one variable.

In any other industry with cyclical demand equipment is often worked until likely maintenance costs exceed marginal profits. Fully depreciated equipment can have a major (positive) impact on the P&L for struggling companies. As industry demand rises older, less efficient, equipment is brought out to operate at a higher marginal cost. The oil industry is going the same way and while newer rigs and jack-ups may be preferred for drilling work that is clearly not the case in all situations. In plug-and-abandonment work in particular, which is less time-sensitive and more price-sensitive, there is absolutely no indication that new rigs are preferred unless their performance compensates for a cost differential (a very high bar to pass). There is also minimal-to-no evidence of newer rigs attracting anything like the sort of day rate that would allow them to cover their cost of capital versus new-build cost which is surely the first stage in a demand driven recovery?

There has been a lot of discussion lately about the new investors in the North Sea and how they are changing the economic makeup of the area, the UKCS in particular. For the supply chain one thing the new (operationally and/or financially) leveraged companies definitely bring is a relentless focus on pragmatism and cost control that simply was not as evident at larger E&P companies (who tend to excel at larger more complex developments). These might well be the right type of companies to extract the maximum resources from a mature basin, but for the supply chain the relentless focus on cost control over global and gold standards marks a significant change in procurement priorities. This is a long-term deflationary trend for the supply chain.

However, for the subsea and supply industries on the UKCS they better hope this works. The most recent stats from Oil and Gas UK show that CapEx work simply does not have the drilled inventory for a quick upturn in demand, and while the construction assets play in the maintenance market oversupply will continue. The decline in development wells, which drive tie-back activity and is leading indicator of small field developments, is what is causing huge problems for the tier-2 subsea contractors on the demand side. This isn’t going to change until drilling programmes increase in volume.

UKCS Statistics (2017)

Oil and Gas UK activity 2017.png

Source: Oil and Gas UK.

 

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