Financial crises comparisons…

This article from Gillian Tett on whether we have learnt the lessons from previous financial crises contains this quote:

But whatever their statistical size, crises share two things. First, the pre-crisis period is marked by hubris, greed, opacity — and a tunnel vision among financiers that makes it impossible for them to assess risks. Second, when the crisis hits, there is a sudden loss of trust, among investors, governments, institutions or all three. If you want to understand financial crises, then, it pays to remember that the roots of the word “credit” comes from the Latin “credere”, meaning “to believe”: finance does not work without faith. The irony, though, is that too much trust creates bubbles that (almost) inevitably burst.

My hypothesis is that offshore energy has suffered both from the bursting of a credit bubble (that saw for example its largest specialist lender DVB Bank go effectively bankrupt), as well as a structural change in the demand for offshore oil brought on by shale. The interrelationship between these two events is at the core of my thinking.

But the above paragraph is clearly a good summation of the 2000-2014 offshore boom. As in a banking crisis offshore asset owners had high embedded leverage on long term financing contracts funded with a series of smaller and shorter duration contracts with E&P companies. The asset owners, like banks, were committed to a long-term collection of highly illiquid assets that relied on a buoyant short-term contracting market. Like all booms there was clearly “hubris, greed, and opacity”.

When this delicate balance changed the enitre funding model of the industry was called into question and the lack of rebound on the demand side has led to severe overcapacity issues that – understandably – have left stakeholders reluctant to address. This quote also seems apt:

But shattered trust is hard to restore — particularly when governments or bankers try to sweep problems under the carpet, say with creative accounting tricks. “You can put rotten meat in the freezer to stop it smelling — but its still rotten,” one Japanese official joked to me as he watched American attempts to reassure the markets, turning to some of the same tricks the Tokyo government had once tried — and failed — to use a decade before.

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