Change at the margin… shale versus offshore…

Shelf Drilling US.png

The map above and the statement above are taken from the Shelf Drilling prospectus. According to management, as can be clearly seen, there has been a structural change in the market and it simply isn’t coming back. 28 jack ups gone. Forever.

My only point on this is when you read about 90 units being scrapped since 2014 and 31 this year alone that is good in terms of helping restore the demand supply balance. But a market that used to have 40 jack-ups at it’s peak is never coming back and could conceivably go to zero. 1/3 of the scrappings just reflected a decline in the size of the market. And Mexico isn’t looking good either. Strangely none of the waterfall charts that show scrapping add back in an allowance for the accepted end state of the US Gulf? So of the 285 jackups on contract 10% of that number have had their market permanently removed and must surely impact on any credible scenario of market recovery?

Yes many in the GoM will have been the ones scrapped and will have been the older and less capable units, certainly not premium. But the point is there has been a structural change due to shale that has removed an geographical segment of the jack-up market and those need to be accounted for in a simplistic scrapping scenario. It also mean that if the market is “certain” to double in five years then other areas actually need to grow proportionately more to pick up the slack?

There has been a structural change in the Gulf market. Shallow water is out and large fields are in. Many of the offshore guys have probably gone onshore for the same money and the expense of laying off-take infrastructure in shallow water just isn’t worth it for companies now. This is a unique feature of the Gulf, although in Mexico they also appear to have largely exhausted the shallow water fields, but a factor with utilisation and supply/demand balances for the entire global fleet.

For those hoping for some Mexican respite this article from the FT last week will not be good news quoting the almost certain-to-be new finance minister:

“We certainly want more and more foreign, not just Mexican, investment and we’re going to open the door to everything,” Carlos Urzúa told the FT.  “The only exception is that there’s going to be a halt to oil tenders, ” said Mr Urzúa, an economics professor and published poet with a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “But apart from that, anywhere they want to invest, let them invest.” [Emphais added].

The growth in the GoM is all deep water high-flow rate, high CapEx projects. None of those can be serviced by jack-ups and given the international scope of companies like Rowan and Ensco some units are clearly destined for international markets.

This is just a small example of how small change at the margin affects the overall picture of demand for offshore assets. In 2014 the US was 14% of the jack-up market according to the figures above and recovery boom in the years ahead when the market has contracted meaningfully will be a rare feat if it occurs.

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