Time for plan B…

A somewhat ambitiously titled article in the FT seemed to have something for everyone: looking for any excuse to claim the impending supply shortage? Check.  And for the sceptics? Check. To save you reading ‘The Big Read’ I’ll give you a quick synopsis: the reporter spoke to a load of people (mainly analysts) who said there will be a supply crunch but didn’t know when, and then spoke to another bunch of people (who actually make the investments) and they said they don’t think there will be.

The fact is that oil will be a substantial part of the energy mix for a very long time. How we extract it and the relative costs of doing so are far more interesting questions. The E&P companies will be substantial businesses for a long time to come no matter how alarmist some warnings maybe.

But the article does mention the mythical $100 per barrel… just not a timeframe… in fact if you are looking for comfort for when this supply crunch will occur the only person prepared to put a timescale on it is ex-BP CEO Tony Heywood, and you are unlikely to get much comfort from this:

“I don’t think the supermajors really believe the long-term story of peak demand,” Mr Hayward told the Financial Times last week. “Looking at the trajectory, we’re more likely to have a supply crunch in the early 2020s.”

If you really believed in the supply crunch I can’t work out why you wouldn’t sell your house and just go long on Exxon Mobil? According to this article on Bloomberg they are staying as a pure oil and gas supermajor and being punished by the stockmarket for it. Buy their undervalued shares and when the supply crunch comes all their reserves are worth the market price and they have production capacity? And in  the meantime you collect the dividend?

The alternative in the offshore world appears to be buying investments in highly speculative asset companies with no order book that are relying entirely on a macro recovery for their plans to work. At this point in the cycle, and without some clear indication of when any of these plans can return actual cash to the investors, the only thing certain is that they supply side still has a lot of adjustment to go. The big contractors are starting to pull away from the small operators because a) they do the large developments currently in vogue, b) scale has economic advantages in an era of low utilisation, and c) why use a small company where your prepaid engineering work is effectively an unsecured creditor? Expect the flight to quality to continue in the project market.

Frankly if you are long floating assets you simply cannot disregard comments like this from one of the biggest CapEx spenders in the world:

“We’re becoming more efficient at how we deploy capital,” Mr Gilvary says. He adds that BP and other energy groups are ploughing a middle road: raising oil production by using technology to sweat more barrels out of existing fields, while also funnelling smaller amounts of capital into so-called short-cycle projects such as US shale.

BP of course continue to deliver mega-projects where they think they have ‘advantaged’ oil. They just expect to pay less for it:

BP Unit costs.png

Reintroducing cost inflation into the industry will be harder than any previous cyclical upturn is my bet.

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