What is an offshore construction vessel worth?

There is an article from Subsea World News here that is sure to have bank risk officers and CFOs choking over their coffee… VesselValues new OCV is launching a new analytics tool for the sector. The ten most valuable vessels in the OCV sector are apparently:

  • Normand Maximus $189m;
  • Fortitude $99 million;
  • Deep Explorer $97 million;
  • Siem Helix 2 $96 million;
  • Seven Kestrel $95 million;
  • Siem Helix 1 $95 million;
  • Island Venture $94 million;
  • Viking Neptun $92 million;
  • Far Sentinel $90 million;
  • Far Sleipner $89 million;

Firstly, look at the depreciation this would imply? As an example the Maximus was delivered in 2016 at a contract price of USD $367m. So in less than 2 years the vessel has dropped about 48% in value. Similarly the two new DSVs the Seven Kestrel and Deep Explorer appear to be worth about 67% of value for a little over two years depreciation.

Secondly, the methodology. I broadly agree with using an economic fundamentals approach to valuation. And I definitely agree that in a future of lower SURF project margins that these assets have a lower price than would have been implied when the vessels were ordered. I have doubts that you can seperate out completely the value of a reel-lay ship like Maximus from the value of the projects it works on but you need to start somewhere. It is clear that SURF projects will have a lower structural margin going forward and logically this must be reflected in a vessel’s value so I agree with the overall idea of what is being said.

There is a spot market for DSVs on the other hand so their value must reflect this as well as the SURF projects market where larger contractors traditionally cross-subsidised their investment in these assets. A 33% reduction in value in two years might well reflect an ongoing structural change in the North Sea DSV market and is consistent with the Nor/Boskalis transactions on an ongoing basis. This adds weight to the fact York have overpaid significantly for Bibby, who would be unable to add any future capacity to the DSV market in the pricing model this would imply and not even be earning enough to justify a replacement asset. Given the Polaris will need a fourth special survey next year, and is operating at below economic value at current market rates, even justifying the cost of the drydock in cash terms on a rational basis is difficult.

Depreciation levels like this imply clearly that the industry needs less capital in it and a supply side reduction to adjust to normal levels. Technip and Subsea 7 are big enough to trade through this and will realise the reality of similar figures internally even if they don’t take a writedown to reflect this. Boskalis looks to have purchased at fair value not bargain value to enter the North Sea DSV market. SolstadFarstad on the hand have major financial issues and Saipem locked into a charter rate for the next 8 years at way above market rates, but with earnings dependent on the current market, will have to admit that while the Maximus might be a project enabler it will also be a significant drag on operational earnings. The VesselsValue number seems to be a fair reflection of what that overall number might look like.

The longer the “offshore recovery” remains illusory the harder it will be for banks, CFOs, and auditors to ignore the reality of some sort of rational, economic value criteria, for offshore assets based on the cash flows the assets can actually generate.

4 thoughts on “What is an offshore construction vessel worth?

  1. The Far Sleipner was doing ROV drill support work for a few weeks in the Congo last year… This is a vessel twice the size of the Well Servicer. If you have a look at some pictures and the specs of this magnificent vessel you would understand just how ridiculous this was.

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  2. I find this tool as rather naive.
    Why?
    Because most of the vessels listed are actually unsellable.
    It is almost. impossible to gauge the price as Constellation went to Saipem for 275 million but if Maximus was to be bought by the Saipem I doubt it will command this price, as would be cheaper to charter.
    Technip and Subsea 7 don’t need an additional asset…. so…. who will buy?

    Market is illiquid and the actual price is capped at how much profit a company can make with an asset minus the amount reduced in negotiations as the big three have strong bargaining power.

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