Market forecasts as structural breaks….[Wonkish]

Not for everyone this post but important if you are involved in strategic planning. The above chart is from the latest Subsea 7 Q1 numbers. The problem I have with these charts is what statisticians call “structural breaks“. Basically if the underlying data has changed then you need to change your forecast methodology. As I have argued here and here (although it’s a general themse of this blog) I think there is sufficient evidence that large E&P companies are commissioning less offshore projects when they become economically viable in the past on NPV basis. I am not sure that all the forecast models reflect this.

This break in the historical patterns has really important forecasting implications because when you see whichever market forecast  it has made an assumption, whether formally through a regression model or on a project-by-project basis, that x number of projects will be commissioned at y price of oil (outside of short term data which logs actual approvals). If there has been a stuctural change in the demand side then y (commissioned offshore projects) will be lower, and on a lower trajectory to x (the oil price) permanently, than past cycles.

E&P companies are not perfectly rational. As the oil price gets to $60 there is no set programme that triggers a project. For sure the longer the price stays high it increases the probability of projects being commissioned but it is a probability and the time scale of has changed I would argue. I think it is why demand has surprised many on the downside because there has been a change in the forecast relationship between offshore projects and the spot price of oil.

 

3 thoughts on “Market forecasts as structural breaks….[Wonkish]

  1. VIR (NPV as a ratio to NPC) needs to be better than what you’d get leaving cash in the bank (40%). Over and above VIR UDC (Unitised Dev Cost) needs to be affordable (less ultimate recovery less wells same VIR) and break even price needs to be robust to market shocks ($40/bbl).

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