E&P versus offshore strategy plans… Not what you think?

Last week ExxonMobil released its analyst day presentation. It has a number of interesting things, but I wanted to highlight the fact that although it feels like E&P companies are back making real money, which they are, it may not feel like that to them. And as this article on Bloomberg makes clear investors in these companies want management to keep the lid on CapEx, which is one of the cash flows they really can control:

Exxon argues it has a formidable set of projects, pointing to such goodies as offshore Guyana discoveries, as well as the Permian basin. The problem is that investors have seen this story before, and quite recently, with the oil majors. And while Exxon’s reputation might once have enabled it to simply be trusted to deliver, that is no longer the case.

Here is a Bloomberg shot showing you what would have happened had you purchased 1000 ExxonMobil shares in 2013 and sold at the end of 2017 (about when plans were probably being agreed):

image.PNG

You were down fractionally in the share price and up overall marginally only after reinvesting dividends. So the Directors are probably not coming under massive pressure to throw more money at production when 4 years after the price slump the owners of the ExxonMobil are trading below their 2013 entry cost (or fund market value). This is very oversimplified, but I make the point only because it has become an article of faith amongst some in the offshore space that E&P companies are verging on the irrational by not increasing offshore project spend when it is far from clear they are, or that they face pressure to do so.

Which is why you end up with a slide like this from a company that has just made some huge offshore discoveries:

Disciplined value.png

ExxonMobil focuses on Brazil and Guyana in terms of offshore development. I think the larger E&P companies switching to larger developments only offshore continues to mark a real shift in the market because the smaller companies just don’t have access to the development funding they used to for smaller fields.

I thought this was interesting:

XOM Guyana.png

Versus shale:

XOM tight oit.png

ExxonMobil appears to be implying shale has a lower breakeven pricing at $35 to get to a great than 10% return? And as always productivity is increasing:

XOM productivity increase.png

The other thing that struck me about the presentation was just how many investment opportunities management have across the portfolio, and they are increasing CapEx across the forecast period from USD 24bn to USD 30bn, but it is clear that downstream and other activities are also important. Investors want growth but maybe some at lower volatility that a fluctuating oil price offers, and as this graph shows ExxonMobil will make money at USD 60 ppb oil, but not ridiculous amounts.

XOM Fundamental.png

Obviously XOM is a leveraged bet on the price of oil increasing. But at the moment the upstream managers probably feel they have a free option on the excess capacity in the offshore supply chain that means any rapid price increases can be met with shale and a slower commissioning pace of offshore fields. Also these larger discoveries allow greater flexibility to speed up infield developments at a lower cost and asset utilisation.

Bourbon Offshore recently released it’s Bourbon in Motion strategy which to my mind is one of the most honest assessments of the scale of the challenge facing offshore companies I have seen. I think Bourbon are well worth listening to because I cannot think of another company that has played the capital markets as well as they have in financing their operations. Here in 3 simple points is the problem every offshore company faces:

3 issues.png

And it was really nice to see it wasn’t followed by a slide which said “but we are doing lots of tendering”.

A little history is required: In 2008  Bourbon had €1.3bn in debt and was focusing almost exclusively offshore. The annual report for that year described the returns in the offshore business as “exceptional”, and like all good companies it took this as a price signal to invest and grow the business further. Bourbon did this, because as the financing market was so flush it could borrow a lot of money, by 2013 debt had increased by €1bn to reach €2.2bn and the Directors were so confident about the business they proposed a 34% increase in the dividend.

In 2013 and 2014, taking advantge of the exceptional sentiment in the market Bourbon sold, and then leased back, vessels worth €1.65bn to Standard Chartered and ICBC which also allowed them to write up the value of the rest of the fleet by €900m in value. It’s hard to overstate how good the timing of this transaction was, timed literally to perfection, as the vessel market peaked in value they got two banks to pay not only top dollar for the assets but lease them back at less than 11% per annum. I doubt if sold on the open market here these now commodity vessels would fetch a third of that.

I am not implying Bourbon knew this would happen, what I am saying is they worked out that perhaps this was as good as it was going to get in the industry and they should bank what they could and take some (more) money off the table for their shareholders. As a management team it made them look very smart.

So when Bourbon tell you things are grim I think it comes with a degree of credibility few can match. Particularly when backed by some solid data:

The worst crisis ever

Which we all know by now. As I have said here repeatedly understanding that CapEx expenditure is what drives utilisation at the margin, and therefore overall fleet profitability, is crucial. And the reason I used ExxonMobil above was to show that this CapEx number, which I call “The Demand Fairy”, is unlikely to miraculously change in the short-term.

Offshore will still be an important part of the energy mix, but the growth of shale, as the left hand graph below makes clear, is having a huge impact on vessel utilisation and therefore industry profitability:

Bourbon Offshore production.png

The region reserved for shale is an area 3 or 4 years ago most people investing in offshore would have believed their assets would be servicing. And when you rely on 75-80% utilisation just to break even that in effect changes the whole economics of the industry, because if it knocks even 10% utilisation back across the fleet everyone is struggling to break even on their assets.

The right hand graph shows the enormous drop in CapEx. The fact that more projects are being sanctioned but the spend is lower just highlights what company results are showing: the volume of work has increased slightly this year but the value being paid for it has not (or reduced in some cases). This is likely to be a structural feature of the industry going forward that previous margin levels will simply not recover.

Like everyone else Bourbon is making a play to drive down the cost of operation of its commodity assets and add more value to the value of its subsea assets through moving up the value chain. Across the industry an entire species of contractor that used to make a good living by supporting larger contractors now aims to do more projects directly with E&P companies. Bourbon, like others, will likely win some market share, but they will do this by competing on price and driving industry margins down overall. For Bourbon it will still feel like more revenue than running the vessel alone, and in the long run it maybe, but grow to big and the larger contractors will be unlikely to charter your vessels. That slow increase in the blue bar on the graph is a result of all this extra capacity coming to market on the contractor side and why good Bus Dev staff in the industry are still remarkably employable.

It’s a post for another day the problem for offshore demand in shallow water, where projects could be done by flexibles and a vessel-of-opportunity, is that the smaller companies who used to do these projects simply have no access to the capital markets. Capital markets prefer smaller projects to be shale-based now where the cash-flow cycle is shorter. Think of the last time an Ithaca Athena development was commissioned on the UKCS?

Obviously the E&P companies are doing better than the offshore supply chain, the point is that they are not doing so much better that things are likely to change immediately. Bourbon seems to realise the future may look a lot like the present on the demand side and adjusting its business model accordingly.

(Hat-tip: SE).

 

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