Market equilibrium…

The graph above comes from a recent Tidewater presentation. There is also this slide from the same presentation:

OSV Business Drivers.png

Now Tidewater is a global supply vessel company, rather than a subsea player, but the data cannot be ignored: it is the Jackups and Floaters that generate future demand for the industry. The subsea vessels may not be quite as dependent as the supply vessels on the ratios of JU/Floaters to vessels, but it will be close and directionally similar. There is simply not enough front end work being done for a realistic scenario where anything like the current fleet is saved. Any realistic scenario of market equilibrium involves and increase in demand and a large adjustment in supply.

Demand does appear to have hit rock bottom. However, market equilibrium, which I would define as a situation is which those operating vessels covered their cost of capital, appears to be a long way off.

I would urge you to read the whole of a conference call Hornbeck gave recently (courtesy of Seeking Alpha):

Todd Hornbeck:

Beyond a doubt in nearly every category 2017 was the most challenging year we ever have confronted in our 20-year history. We experienced the full force of the offshore meltdown in all of our core operating regions and across our vessel classes. In the Gulf of Mexico an average of 21 deepwater drilling units were working during the year. We started and finished the year with almost zero contract coverage for our vessels meaning there are financial results reflect a true market conditions with little residual noise from day rates contracted in better times…

So where are we today and what do we believe 2018 holds in store for us?

To begin with, we think that the conditions for recovery offshore will begin to gel and that the necessary elements for improvement in our core markets maybe taking shape. Improved oil prices reflecting a more balanced oil market, improved global economic conditions, and healthy global demand for oil cannot be ignored nor can the significant under investment in deepwater over the last several years by our customers. While we think weak market conditions shaped by a low offshore drilling rig activity at OSV overcapacity will continue in 2018. We also think this year could mark the beginning of the end of this downturn.

Current healthy production from the Gulf of Mexico is unsustainable absent new investment by our customers. Depletion is real. The same is true in Mexico and Brazil. Consider this in 2014 there were 114 floaters under contract across our three focus areas of operation in this hemisphere plus 45 jack-ups in Mexico. Today there are 57 floaters and 20 Mexican jack-ups under contract in our core markets. So the contracted rig counts have been cut in half…

That said, we still expect OSV demand in 2018 to resemble 2017 in which we saw only 21 floating drilling units working in the Gulf of Mexico on average. We can even make a case that the drilling rig count to fall into the teens. As a reminder, there were 39 active floating rigs working in the Gulf of Mexico in 2015… [emphasis added]

James Harp (CFO):

In fact, our effective day rates thus far in 2018 are down substantially for both our OSVs and MPSVs…

Hornbeck is a Gulf of Mexico focused operator with both subsea and offshore vessels. The Gulf of Mexico is still regarded as one of the major investment growth areas in subsea, but it shows off what a low base this is, and how unevenly an industry “recovery” will be spread.

Basically what I am saying is  we are in a recovery phase (and you can agree with analysts who argue this), but as Todd Hornbeck states, it is off such a low base, and with such a vast amount of oversupply in vessels and rigs, that the industry will face low profitability for years. It is clear day rates in some markets and segments will be higher over the summer, some PSVs are being bid at £25k per day in June/July/August, but these rates need to be averaged over a year not a few months.

Any OSV/rig/subsea company strategy that doesn’t reflect the fact that the market will be significantly smaller than it has been previously, and the “recovery” level will be smaller than 2014, just isn’t realistic. Just buying boats and hoping for mean reversion seems to ignore the  data presented above. This time it will not be like the dip of 2009.

One thought on “Market equilibrium…

  1. Anyone who has any reasonable term experience in the OSV market ‘knows’ that the volatility in the market has always been exploratory drilling rigs. A rule of thumb estimate is three to four OSV per rig to keep it running, depending on location. Multiply the number of stacked rigs in a condition likely to be reactivated (another story) by four and you get an idea of how many of the laid up OSV fleet have a chance of being operated again. All the rest are merely backlog for Gujarat.

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