A market recovery? Not in the data…

Danish Ship Finance have just published their latest report. As usual it is thorough and measured, and frankly not uplifting if you are long on vessels or rigs. The graph above really covers a lot of things I have blogged about here, it’s all well and good coming up with graphs showing how offshore MUST get more investment, as if it were a divine economic law, but that isn’t what companies are ACTUALLY planning on spending.

Another great graph is this one:

DSV Charter Rates DSF.png

What the commentary in the report omits, and I think is very important, is the fact that the divers costs, which are c. £50k for a 15 man team, have not dropped. So for the vessel owner the rate hasn’t dropped 50% it has actually dropped 67% because the labour cost of the dive crew is fixed (again I have blogged about the Baumol effect here). This is probably more pronounced on DSVs than any other asset class but it is a real problem for offshore because the industry isn’t getting more productive (just cheaper which is different). Removing 67% of the revenue for any business is bad, in an industry that had binged on debt, as can be seen, it is beyond a disaster.

DSF also note that while spending on Subsea Production Systems is rising this because smaller step out developments are being done, which require less vessel days, than larger greenfield developments. Again I have discussed this before here.

DSF SPS.png

Finally, it highlights again the scale of the pullback in offshore and why any recovery will not be a repeat of the past. The speed at which contractors are working through backlog is a real concern. Subsea 7 won work recently on the Johan Castberg field that was valued at c. USD 2.0 – 5.0m per well, a 75% decline from the peak. So even an increase in the volume of work awarded will not help the industry recover to previous levels.

Big Three Backlog.png

Subsea Contract Awards.png

This matters because offshore used so much leverage to purchase assets in the past. Now the companies revenues and profits are materially smaller and they are struggling to pay the banks back leading to a credit crisis in the industry. Debt is a fixed obligation that must be paid back for firms to have value and that is much harder to do when the industry is in a deflationary cycle. This is no different to a banking crisis without a central bank.  It is this credit crisis that when combined with the demand crisis makes this so serious. DVB Bank, a specialist lender to the sector, went bankrupt! Indeed I have discussed this many times and it is one my one recurring theme.

Last year probably was the low point in terms of demand. But as the first graph makes clear there is not a wave of investment coming here, just a long slow increase in spending.

Read the whole thing. Many business plans simply don’t reflect this reality yet. Not everyone will survive. 2018 promises to be another tough year for asset heavy companies.

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