North Sea DSV update… Has the Vard vessel been sold? Will IMR save the world?

We’re eyeball to eyeball, and I think the other fellow just blinked.”

Secretary of State Dean Rusk, during the Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962

It was a little windy (80-100 mph) up the mountain today as you can see from the photo… I thought it was a good metaphor for offshore at the moment anyway…

So in clearing out my emails I have now been told Technip have reached a deal with Vard on the 801. A price of ~$100m, but with no delivery risk and commissioning liability for Vard, has apparently been agreed. Technip is large enough for that to be a sensible risk to take as the Wellservicer needs to be replaced at some point. Unless ordered by SS7 or Technip I think this will be the last North Sea class DSV built without E&P company contract coverage for at least 10 years, maybe ever,  barring some unheard of change in the market. (This isn’t the place to get into why I don’t think any of the UDS vessels will end up North of the Med).

We are watching how an extremely illiquid and asset specific market clears in a huge market downturn. The interesting thing is that Technip and Subsea 7 seem to be making a renewed commitment to IMR having really lost focus during the construction boom, this graphic from Technip makes clear:

Technip Market Growth.png

If you are a smaller IMR contractor expect Technip to come up more often on tenders you are spending money on bidding. A near new DSV fleet fits this theme. It also shows you what sort of percentage/revenue increase on IMR a market leading company thinks it can get and how it is planning on taking market share. Smaller companies should be worried and anyone who publishes documents claiming they can grow organically at 50% in this market just isn’t serious.

I find the pricing of this asset fascinating: to Technip and Subea 7, taking a 25 year asset view it is an asset you could spend some real money on. One needs to replace the Wellservicer and the other the Pelican. But outside of those two companies the asset is almost unsellable at anything like it’s build cost. If you can’t operate that vessel in the North Sea (and it’s not even NORSOK) then it’s just an ROW DSV and you would be lucky to get $50-60m… and only then if you could find a bank to lend against it. So really they are just bidding against each other to take on the asset (not that I think Subsea 7 were)? How long do you make Vard sweat or risk seeing a really good vessel go to a competitor? Other vessels could also have been purchased from distress sellers e.g. How much better is the Vard vessel to the Toisa Pegasus (currently in lay-up)?

Both sides blinked at 100m if you ask me. More compromise than Mexican standoff.

The Seven Kestrel is arguably the best DSV in the world and as soon as construction work starts to pick-up SS7 will just ask the Koreans to build a replica (for less) if the need to relace the Pelican. And at that point that will be the last North Sea class DSV built for a very long time.

Both Technip and SS7 have some pretty new DSVs and both have an old (fully depreciated) one that operates when the market peaks… But as I wrote earlier the only realistic scenario for 2018 is for North Sea day rates to stay low for DSV work, and in this market making a trade off against a low capital cost to lose money on OpEx for a bargain purchase is getting ever harder to make? The lower than expected contract size for the Snorre Extension for Subsea 7 shows how low margins are for awarded work at the moment and how long it may take for day rates to recover. And if, as looks likely,  Boskalis and Bibby start a brutal price war to gain or keep market share, then dropping $100m on a vessel to go out at $100k a day (a cash loss amount in the North Sea) doesn’t seem that clever at the moment. Go back $10m a year for a few years on a DSV, easily possible in this market, and savings in CapEx were illusory.

Optimists point to graphs like this:

North SEa SAt MArket.png

But this ignored Boskalis taking the Nor vessels and Vard vessel replacing the Rockwater 1. [As a methodological point it is also worth noting that each movement on the vertical axis represents 3 DSV vessel years! showing you how easily the forecast could be out here]. It is also worth noting that if those Decom figures are wrong, and they look agressive, the market imbalance is illusory. No one in this market is going to force E&P companies to pay divers to remove mattresses etc off the seabed.. its just not going to happen. Just as importantly, a modest increase in day rates, which would see the DSV fleet operating at below economic cost, could curtail IRM or EPIC project demand as this graph seems to assume constant demand. There is a large amount of latent supply in the market that will come into the market as rates increase (which happened in 2014)… economic change happens at the margin… which is not reflected in a static graph like this.

Ultimately running vessels, even for companies the size of Subsea 7 and Technip, is a utilisation game as the fixed costs are so high that a small drop in utilisation and day rates /project margins can lead to a massive drop in profitability and cash losses. Shareholders would not welcome a cash call if it means they have overpaid for vessels and ultimately been diluted in a down market, and a North Sea class DSV is a very expensive vessel to have underutilised. I am always reminded mentally that Technip looked seriously at acquiring CGG not that long ago… in which case this would be a great bargain…

Let’s wait and see…I still have my doubts… but if the Vard 801 rocks up to the North Sea in April/May under Technip control for the North Sea summer my photo above will be a good reflection of economic conditions for North Sea DSV owners in 2018…

One thought on “North Sea DSV update… Has the Vard vessel been sold? Will IMR save the world?

  1. Jeremy,

    Happy new year! Just wondering how good your source is on the FTI deal mentioned below? I know they’ve been scouting for it for quite a while, but to my understanding that was just to keep SUBC away from it…

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s