DOF Subsea, Bibby Offshore, and The Pecking Order Theory…

We always plan too much and think too little.

Joesph Schumpeter

We were succeeding. When you looked at specifics, this became a war of attrition. We were winning.

General William Westmoreland on US involvement in Vietnam

DOF AS/ Subsea reported numbers yesterday that were frankly terrible. All those who keep telling you the market is getting better seem blithely ignorant of the constantly decreasing financial performance of nearly all the companies in the sector. It’s like Comical Ali or General Westmoreland constantly assuring everyone that victory is just around the corner, if not in fact delivered. Tendering, like the Viet Cong, never ceases to stop appearing in increasing numbers, and it will bring victory…

I have another theory why tendering is increasing: there are a lot of engineers who are worried about their jobs. In a completely rational strategy they are increasing the number of parties who receive tendering documents, spending more time assessing them, and making the tenders ever more complex. Turkeys don’t vote for Christmas. More people appear to be spending increasing amounts of time and money on the same tenders and it is making industry margins even thinner, and allowing management to claim that completely unproductive work is actually a sign of an industry returning to health.

But back to the numbers… this is the same DOF Subsea that as recently as Q1 and Q2 this year was hoping to get an IPO away. It’s a good reminder, as if anyone needed one, that when insiders are selling out you should be wary of what you are buying. I call it the Feltex Carpets or Dick Smith theory. Economists have however developed a far more robust theory about how firms decide on their capital structure: The Pecking Order Theory. It’s based on the information asymmetry that exists between the insiders of the firm (shareholders and management) and the outsiders (investors and funders). Basically it’s a deeply cynical view (which probably means it is right) that managers and owners use internally generated funds first, then use debt and only issue equity as a last resort.

In a classic paper Myers and Majluf (1984) argue managers and owners issue equity only when they believe it is overpriced. It is very hard not believe that early in 2017 the insiders at DOF Subsea (i.e. the private equity owners) looked at the vessel schedules and the likely win/loss ratio of the tender pipeline (not the amount of tendering), and decided that if they could dump some stock they would. Luckily investors are aware of the asymmetric information problem and “they discount the firm’s new and existing risky securities when new issues are announced“. Or in other words they just refuse to buy at the asking price which is what happened in the DOF Subsea case.

You should always be wary of financial presentations that start with highlights that don’t include any financials (like the latest DOF Subsea one). Just to be clear the DOF Subsea revenue was down 11% on the same period as last year and EBITDA was down 6%. Luckily, they are doing more tendering.

DOF also helpfully provided this chart of the business:

DOF Business Model.png

Basically without the long term chartering business, which is really just a risk diversification move by Technip, there is no business: the 10% EBITDA on the projects side wouldn’t cover the economic costs and frankly potentially the cash costs either. This is a business where unrealised gains from derivatives (probably interest rate and/or currency swaps) were 6 x the operating loss for the period of NOK (41m).  Year to date DOF Subsea has had to turnover NOK 2.8bn to get a mere NOK 45m in profit. It is pretty clear from the above that actually the projects business, with 17 very expensive fixed costs assets, is not an economic entity; and as I have said before you need a very good return on the vessels on long-term charter in Brazil because as the above graphic makes clear if their contracts aren’t renewed (and no one believes they will be on anything like the current terms) then the value of the vessels will drop like a stone if you believe at some point a vessel is only worth what it can earn in cash terms. The number of other activities you can perform with a 650t vertical lay system is actually pretty small which lowers resale value regardless of how much it cost to build. In which case the value of the business is probably much smaller than the current shareholders would be willing to admit to themselves. Time is not a friend to the investors in this deal because everyday they hold this company future investors get one day closer to finding out what happens in Brazil.

DOF Subsea is a pretty good projects house and the EBITDA margin is just a reflection of market overcapacity. If you were going to invest new money in a subsea projects business you would need therefore to look at that as a realistc EBITDA margin you could earn for the foreseeable future until further supply capacity leaves the market or there is a significant increase in demand. Bear that in mind if you were, for example, looking at injecting funds into a company about to default on its bonds…

The Pecking Order Theory is also helpful in explaining (some of) the shennanigans involved in the Bibby Offshore attempted refinancing at the moment. The insider shareholders in this case also saw the writing the on the wall and in January 2016 took a cheeky £20m off the table in the form of a dividend (after a c.£40m dividend recap that was flagged in the prospectus). In the next 12 months Bibby Offshore lost £52m at the operating profit level, and it must have been known to the Directors by June 16 that without some sort of miracle the business would require a restructuring (which to be clear is an event of default as defined by the ratings agencies even if consensual). It was certainly apparent to any responsible Director by Oct 16.

Bibby Offshore cannot realistically make an interest payment in December, and management have qualified the accounts such that it is not a going concern without a refinancing. And now  the insiders (Bibby Line Group and management) have decided they want outsiders to put money in. They don’t think the equity is overvalued (they know it is valueless);  the insiders think the debt overvalued is and there is too much of it. All the talk of a supportive shareholder reveals it for the sophistry it is: the insiders don’t believe enough to contribute financially. BLG aren’t putting in any of the £60m they have taken out not just because they don’t have it but also because they know the business better than anyone and The Pecking Order Theory makes clear they want someone elses money here.

One deal that is on the table is some “Super Senior” financing (i.e. paid before anyone else) provided by the distressed debt desk at Deutsche Bank. Now Deutsche are arguably the best desk at this in the City, but if you need this sort of financing it is pretty much the end of the road. If EY have resorted to the distress desk at Deutsche as an alternative it shows that no long term investor is interested. This form of financing is more suited for a company in bankruptcy (where it is called debtor-in-possession financing) than for one imminently approaching it. The Deutsche plan would be to lend fully secured against the Polaris and the Sapphire and give Bibby enough money to make until next summer when DSV day rates miraculously improve and the business can service this new debt and bonds. But don’t the bond holders own those boats I hear you ask? Yes. And I am not close enough to this to know exactly the specifics but the security agent is only likely to hand over the ownership papers to the vessels if the bond holders agree to this (I guess); and (I guess) Deutsche would only advance the funds in conjunction with a writedown of their claim. Unbelievably management will argue they are they best people to trade the business out of this mess.

The real tension here appears to be how much equity the bondholders take, and how consensual the handover is, as the business undertakes a debt-for-equity swap. The bondholders can hold out for 100% of the equity as their only other asset apart from the DSVs (and a couple of ROVs) is the shares of Bibby Offshore, but in  order to follow through on this they have to push the company into administration and a liquidation scenario is completely possible at that point as customers and suppliers refuse to trade. The Bibby/Management/EY plan envisages a far more generous structure whereby any money Bibby Line Group put in is also fully secured and they retain majority control so they can consolidate Bibby Offshore in their Group accounts (20% of net assets). The problem with this is of course that BLG don’t have anywhere near enough money to put in proportionately.

A nightmare scenario for the bondholders is taking over a company in such circumstances where agency conflicts abound and in a practical sense now it is a hostile takeover with management having acted until the last possible moment to realise the rights of the debt holders. It is arguable for all of this year Bibby Offshore should have been run with the creditors interests at the forefront of all decisions and it is clear that this has not happened.

In case you’re wondering what is in it for Deutsche: it’s the fees. They are looking at advancing c. £20-30m on the vessels and it would have to be cleared before the bondholders get paid. They would get a 7 figure upfront fee and an interest rate of c. 15%, and if a default occurred they would sell the assets in a fire sale to get their money as quickly as possible. Which is why you can’t get much money from such deals because the bank needs to be conservative here (and I think this deal will die on broker valuations given the likely fire sale prices of Polaris and Sapphire). The problem is of course that debt got Bibby into this mess and it is very unlikely to be the cure to get them out of it. I don’t think the Deutsche proposal has passed credit committee and even though they would make an eye-watering fee on the this the risk is clear: becoming the proud owner of 2 x North Sea class DSVs (and as their offices are some way from the Thames they wouldn’t even add to the famed Deutsche art collection).

With no significant work booked for next year the Bibby plan relies 100% on day rates increasing significantly above current levels. And therein lies the real problem for the bondholders and any potential distress desk coming in on this: at some point the only solution to a market in oversupply is for some capacity to go. How can Bibby credibly claim to make a better margin than DOF Subsea? At the moment Boskalis look almost certain to enter the market in a big way and other companies are also looking to enter the market. Not only does Bibby need tens of millions of pounds under its current cost structure just to make it until next summer there is actually no certainty that this magical scenario of higher rates will allow them to come close to settling the outstanding debt obligations they are generating to get there.

DOF Subsea made clear that while tendering activity is robust project work is dismal (and indeed they made a specific comment that amounted to a profit warning about it). At 7.0 x debt to last-twelve-months EBITDA DOF Subsea (and everyone else in the market) will be throwing everything into trying to win work… all the non-DSV work will compete with Bibby (no one really expects them to reactivate the SAT system on the Achiever) and they will keep margins at ~EBITDA breakeven in order ot get utilisation. As a committed industrial player that is a rational economic strategy. Subsea 7 and Technip are booking DSV days at less than £120k for 2018 to get utilisation in early and they can clearly keep this up virutally indefinitely. The dumb non-industrial money won’t last as long as those with an operational logic and an industrial strategy + balance sheet in this market.

The problem for the Bibby bondholders is that not only at current prices (.36) have they capitalised the firm at c. £63m, way above what it could hope to earn in an economic sense, it also needs £20-40m just to keep trading until next summer.  The major competitors have no cash flow issues (Boskalis has €1bn in the bank) and every reason to chase market share over profit. There is therefore no rational economic reason why under this scenario North Sea class day rates will rise, particularly if Boskalis enters, and every reason to believe they will stay at current levels. Any rational investor in Bibby Offshore would shut down everything apart from the UK business, but 2 x DSVs in the UK doesn’t justify anything like £60m in value…

The Nor bondholders tried super senior financing on their DSVs in Nov 2016 and it is clear, as they slowly run out of money and cannot raise anymore at anything like the 15% fully super senior they did last time, that when someone says you can’t lose on a North Sea class DSV, you can on some. It’s all down to asset specificity as I have said before. Deutsche and other distress desks will be well aware of the mistake the Nor bondholders made, and frankly if I was going to make a mistake on two DSVs I’d rather do it with the Nor vessels than the Bibby ones.

This will all be resolved soon. A bondholder meeting is scheduled for next week and everyone will lay out their plan. The problem is of course there isn’t one really and it should never been allowed to have get this close to Dec 14 when the interest payment is due. The Bibby plan is for it to continue as a lifestyle business where external investors allow the family and management to stay in control and fund it until the market returns. A few (27) redundancies are underway but in a microcosm of the cost and conflict issues that define the company the CEO’s wife, who runs the Business Excellence department, is staying , as is the Director of Small Pools and Innovation, while the Engineering Manager is made redundant (seriously).

The Bibby plan relies on a small number of bondholders, enough to block the majority, being so afraid of the great unknown they back them to carry on as before. This will just delay things until next summer because the cash burn is just so high that even £20-30m would be gone by this time next year without a wholesale change in market conditions. Handing back the Olympic Bibby cuts the cash burn, and may allow the business to come close to cash break even, although the US will make another substantial trading loss in 2018 as will Norway (and without the Ares why bother?); but doesn’t solve the core problem that the business itself is unprofitable at an operating profit level. Call it the slow-burn and pretend strategy. It was disastrous for Nor as eventually reality comes and the cash is gone. As plans go it is pretty terrible.

But the bondholders don’t have a good one either. The bondholders appears to have spectacularly misread the willingness and ability of Bibby Line Group to support Bibby Offshore as well as how badly the business would perform in 2017 versus 2016 (revenue -50%). Some of the funds involved in the bonds don’t need money from an institution like Deutsche, but unless they control the company they have to hold a bondholder vote every time they want to make any significant moves, and letting the company go into administration risks a total wipe-out of value. Stripping the company back to a smaller business locks-in a loss, continue funding it until the market returns is simply throwing good money after bad and it’s real cash. If they do take the business over they will have an awkward period where almost the entire senior management are changed out and they will be cash funding a business, with an unknown financial commitment, while their consultants re-do the numbers and tell them how much capital they will need to inject. I have done that as a management consultant and it is hugely destabilising while it goes on and makes normal operations almost impossible. If if takes consultants 6 weeks to produce an initial report (30 working days), and Bibby Offshore is losing c. 100k a day in the interim even an emergency facility of £3m + £1m for the consultants is real money given the limited upside sale potential. And then they are only in February with a real funding commitment until the mythical summer season that will save everyone… until it doesn’t…

There is a more complicated scenario here where the Bibby Offshore is restructured through a pre-pack insolvency that the current bondholders control. This will remove the historic liabilities incurred (i.e. property leases, Trinidad tax) and see a new company emerge free of its past shareholders and with a new capital structure. I think this the most likely but it will be a dramatically smaller business and will be run solely for sale ASAP. I also see no guarantee it will realise more value than a liquidation despite it being enormously risky given changing market conditions.

The Bibby Offshore refinancing is a mess and liquidation is clearly a very real possibility here. Getting to less than 28 days of an interest repayment before trying to finalise a refinancing is irresponsible in the extreme when it has been telegraphed for months and your plan is simply not to hand the company to the bondholders. The only thing I can definitely tell you is that if you brought Bibby bonds at .36 you are going to lose some real money here.

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