Macro, gold, and private credit

Like most economic historians I get the gold standard was a bad idea and we shouldn’t go back to it. But I think the hankerings for it really reflect a deeper desire for some sort of control on the monetary base. As Bordo et al ., note:

We find that [financial and banking] crisis frequency since 1973 has been double that of the Bretton Woods and classical gold standard periods and is rivaled only by the crisis-ridden 1920s and 1930s. History thus confirms that there is something different and disturbing about our age.

The problem is credit. Specifically privately created credit and frankly clearly linked to housing and commercial property lending.

bank-lending-1870-2013

The Bretton Woods agreement controlled the capital account and acted as a brake on the pro-cyclicality of asset price inflation (unintentionally) by making it harder to fund these transactions from offshore borrowing. In some ways it linked the domestic asset base to a trading value of the currency. Now land values have gone crazy because capital is international and property has simply become an international asset class.

And as part of this change tThe banking system has been transformed:

The share of mortgage loans in banks’ total lending portfolios has roughly doubled over the course of the past century—from about 30% in 1900 to about 60% today. To a large extent the core business model of banks in advanced economies today resembles that of real estate funds: banks are borrowing (short) from the public and capital markets to invest (long) into assets linked to real estate.

The driving force in this has been lending to households as the article makes clear.

In the modern economy fractional reserve banking is a myth although it may have functioned like that under the gold standard. But now we understand that banks create money via deposits and there is no theoretical limit on money supply creation other than the monetary policy of the central bank, and there are questions as to the effectiveness of this given the openness of the modern international monetary system and banks ability to fund themselves in the wholesale market. In a modern economy, where home ownership is exalted above almost all other policy goals, combined with open bank funding on a international scale,  I struggle to see a limit on the creation of private credit to property and thus it is a system with a self-induced propensity to pro-cyclicality with a put option on the state. Anything less would imperil the banking system itself.

To me, the question isn’t whether we should be going back to the Gold Standard but really could the Bretton Woods agreement be improved and tried with Bancors? Like the Chicago Plan for domestic money, I am too cynical to believe an institutional mechanism that requires so much change is likely to occur, but it is clear that the link between credit and the macroeconomy is the crucial variable that needs to be understood better and be the driver of economic models. A fundamental model of understanding the modern macroeconomy needs to be the driver of credit, something Minsky well understood.

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